Author: Cincinnati Review

miCRo: Traci Brimhall’s “Heart Ghazal: An Essay”

  Associate Editor James Ellenberger: Traci Brimhall’s “Heart Ghazal: An Essay” takes the signature move of the ghazal (the Radif, repetition) and gives it some room to breathe. This allows Traci to expand the (stetho)scope of the piece while still maintaining the Radif’s pounding inevitability. We get animal hearts and ghost hearts, hearts in their bodies and out, hearts in strife and hearts written in pen. Physical hearts butt up against symbolic representations of the heart, as if the two are vying for attention, as if the conflicts we live with are internal as well as external, physical as well...

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Why We Like It: “YouTube Comment 2 to Video of I Like America and America Likes Me by Joseph Beuys” by Yxta Maya Murray

Assistant Editor Molly Reid: Yxta Maya Murray’s story “YouTube Comment 2 to Video of I Like America and America Likes Me by Joseph Beuys,” forthcoming in issue 14.2, straddles forms and categories. The basic conceit—a comment on YouTube—is perhaps the one that disintegrates the easiest. This is not to say that it doesn’t do any work or that it’s superficial; just that Murray seems less interested in using this form to do the usual satiric flaying of internet culture or of the kinds of people who post comments. Instead, this transparent scaffold allows her to investigate the bleeding boundaries...

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miCRo: Jolene McIlwain’s “Drumming”

  Assistant Editor Molly Reid: Jolene McIlwain’s “Drumming” captures a tender moment between a waitress and customer, Dusty and Elbert, both broken in their own way, in the way we all are—the pain we try to fold into distracting shapes, the rhythm we tap along the diner counter, hoping someone will pick up on its tune. This story will break your heart stealthily, by degrees. Get ready. To hear Jolene read her story, you can click below: https://www.cincinnatireview.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Drumming-Jolene-McIlwain.m4a   “Drumming” by Jolene McIlwain   Dusty Sinclair plunged both of her hands in the steaming liquid, felt the slick softness...

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A Partnership with Poets.org!

If you’ve been checking Twitter in the past 24 hours, you’ll have noticed some exciting news about a holy union between The Cincinnati Review and Poets.org. What does this mean for you, dear submitter? Well, if you submit—and have work accepted—to The Cincinnati Review, Kenyon Review, Southern Review, or Tin House, there’s a chance that it’ll also be published digitally on Poets.org (i.e. many, many more eyes on your wonderful work); they’ll pick ten poems from each issue to feature on their site. We’re ecstatic about giving our poets even more exposure, particularity in a digital format.   Since...

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miCRo: Chetna Maroo’s “A Hard Jar of Gunpowder”

  Associate Editor James Ellenberger: We’re pleased to present Chetna Maroo’s short fiction piece “A Hard Jar of Gunpowder” for this week’s miCRo feature. By beginning with allusions to Babel then moving onto smattered quotations from Kepler about attraction, Maroo’s unnamed speaker shows a clear interest in the invisible forces that prod our lives along. The shift into an epistolary mode for the latter half of the piece shows this as well; while the father isn’t around, having abandoned his daughter to “the heathen pit,” the implied knowledge of his existence compels the daughter to write against her situation, finding...

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Drumroll, Please… Contest Results Are In!

Winners of the Ninth Annual Robert and Adele Schiff Awards in Poetry and Prose Samantha Grenrock for her poem “This Was My Bulwark” Sean Gill for his story “For Want of a Better Word” We’d like to start by thanking everybody who submitted. Our contest received 1,143 entries this year, and we relished immersing ourselves in the work of so many gifted writers. The winnowing process wasn’t easy, but after much careful reading and deliberation, we’re elated to offer our heartiest congratulations to poet Samantha Grenrock and fiction writer Sean Gill. Grenrock and Gill will each receive a $1000...

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miCRo: Emilia Phillips’s “‘You Should Write a Poem about That,’ They Say”

[Editors’ note: We’re proud to present our second miCRo feature. Every Wednesday we’ll spotlight a short piece that packs a punch—fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and hybrid works. Chosen by our assistant and associate editors, miCRo features will be taut, timely, and thought provoking. See more information about how to submit in our submission guidelines.]   Assistant Editor Caitlin Doyle: We are pleased to share Emilia Phillips’s evocative piece “‘You Should Write a Poem About That,’ They Say” as the first poetry feature in our miCRo series. With a combination of humor and gravitas, Phillips addresses the complicated interaction between life...

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Good News as Fall Begins

It’s that time of year when people make lists in preparation for the beginning of fall: book lists, Halloween costume lists, ingredients for mulled wine, cool tattoo ideas, premature New Year’s resolutions, and literary awards finalists. Here’s our own list of some pretty great lists! First, some big wins: Contributor Sinéad Morrissey (9.1, 9.2) won the (£10,000!) Forward Prize for Best Collection for her book, On Balance (Carcanet, 2017). The Best New Poets finalists chosen by Natalie Diaz include Paige Lewis (13.1), one of our nominees this year! Also on the list are two other contributors, Leila Chatti (14.2)...

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miCRo, the video!

In celebration of our first miCRo post this week and in anticipation of our second next week, here’s a video promoting our weekly online feature, designed by our wonderful video guru, Ben Dudley!  ...

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miCRo: Laura Maylene Walter’s “Break Apart”

[Editors’ note: We’re proud to present our first miCRo feature. Every Wednesday we’ll spotlight a short piece that packs a punch—fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and hybrid works. Chosen by our assistant and associate editors, miCRo features will be taut, timely, and thought provoking. See more information about how to submit in our submission guidelines.]     Assistant Editor Molly Reid: Laura Maylene Walter’s “Break Apart” proves that small stories don’t have to limit themselves to small subjects. In this piece, Walter tackles nothing less than the birth of a new personal universe, combining the particular and the transcendent in the...

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